Roughly half-way between the island’s eastern and western end, Clarendon ranks as Jamaica’s third largest parish. The parish is predominantly a wide plain, marked by several rivers. Named in honour of the Lord Chancellor Sir Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, the parish was formed from a combination of three small parishes: St. Dorothy’s, Vere and the old parish of […]

Filed Under: Parishes by admin March 1, 2014, 6:41 pm

Roughly half-way between the island’s eastern and western end, Clarendon ranks as Jamaica’s third largest parish. The parish is predominantly a wide plain, marked by several rivers. Named in honour of the Lord Chancellor Sir Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, the parish was formed from a combination of three small parishes: St. Dorothy’s, Vere and the old parish of Clarendon. Before the merger, the capital was Chapelton. Today, May Pen holds the honour of being the capital.

For its size Clarendon is said to be the most populous parish and its economy is booming thanks in large part to Bauxite, Jamaica’s major mineral source which can be found extensively throughout the parish. Additionally most of the island’s tobacco is also grown here along with cotton, pimento, cocoa and indigo. May Pen is also an important citrus packing centre and the main agricultural showground, Denbigh, is on the outskirts.

Lots of history is packed into this parish that boasts several old sugar factories; the famous Milk River Bath, known for its medicinal waters; the Halse Hall Great House as well as the oldest church on the island. To top it off, Vernamfield, the first car-racing track in Jamaica was established in Clarendon and is named in honor of WWI flyer Remington de B. Vernam.

 

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